beef with snow peas

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beef with snow peas  I  frozen pizza, again?

 
I think this is one of the very first things I pinned after joining Pinterest over a year ago. Like many new people to Pinterest I pinned anything that looked remotely interesting so now my boards are littered with no-longer-interesting things. I recently decided to start at the bottom of my food board and work my way up, deleting recipes that no longer appeal to me and actually trying ones that do.

I knew I had this recipe on my board but just kept skipping over it when making my meal plan for the week. Well, last week I finally decided to make it for dinner, and I am so glad that I did. It is delicious! I am seriously thinking about making it again this week because it was that good!

 
beef with snow peas  I  frozen pizza, again?

 
Beef with Snow Peas
From the Kitchen of: The Pioneer Woman

Prep Time: 30 – 45 mins
Servings: 6 – 8
Difficulty: Easy

{Ingredients}
1 ½ lbs flank steak
½ cup low-sodium soy sauce (I used regular soy sauce)
3 Tbsp sherry or cooking sherry
2 Tbsp brown sugar
2 Tbsp cornstarch
1 Tbsp minced fresh ginger (I used ⅛ tsp ginger powder)
8 weight oz fresh snow peas, ends trimmed
5 whole scallions or green onions, cut into half-inch pieces on the diagonal
salt, as needed (use sparingly)
3 Tbsp peanut or olive oil
crushed red pepper, for sprinkling (optional)
jasmine or long grain rice

{Instructions}
Cook rice according to package directions.

Trim fat from flank steak, then slice very thin against the grain. Cut the meat slightly on a diagonal rather than a ninety degree angle to the grain. (I forgot to cut on a diagonal but my meat turned out just fine.)

Mix together soy sauce, sherry, brown sugar, cornstarch, and ginger. Add sliced meat to bowl of liquid and toss with hands. Set aside. (If you prefer, pour half the marinade into a separate bowl before adding the meat; it will be used in the stir fry later.)

Heat oil in a large, heavy skillet (iron is best) or wok over high heat. Add snow peas and stir for 45 seconds. Remove to a separate plate. Set aside. (Don’t crowd the pan; cook in 2 or 3 batches if necessary.)

Allow pan to get very hot again. With tongs, add half the meat mixture, leaving most of the marinade still in the bowl. Add half the scallions. Spread out meat in a single layer as you add it to pan, but do not stir for a good minute. (You want the meat to get as brown as possible in as short amount of time as possible.) Turn meat to the other side and cook for another 30 seconds. Remove to a clean plate. (Again, don’t crowd the pan; cook in several batches if necessary.)

Repeat with other half of meat, allowing pan to get very hot again first. After turning it, add the rest of the cooked meat, the rest of the marinade, and the snow peas. Stir it around over high heat until it bubbles up and boils, about 30 seconds, then turn off the heat. Check seasonings and add salt only if it needs it. Mixture will thicken as it sits. (Note: It does not bother me to boil the same liquid that was used for the meat, but if you poured off half the liquid before soaking the meat, just pour the extra liquid in here.)

Serve immediately over rice. Sprinkle crushed red pepper over the top to give it some spice.

{Notes}
This is a really simple stir fry recipe that can be adapted in any number of ways: use chicken instead of beef, change up the vegetables, etc. Just make sure you let the pan get very hot before adding the ingredients!

{Fun Fact} / {Kitchen Tip}
I was curious why this recipe (and others I have seen) called for a heavy pan. Here’s what I found:

Heavy-bottomed pots and pans are thicker at the base, meaning they tend to absorb and distribute heat from a stovetop burner more evenly than a thin pot or pan. Thin pots and pans are more prone to “hot spots” — areas that heat more quickly than others; hot spots, if not watched carefully, can cause your food to burn. A heavy-bottomed pot or pan will heat and cook your ingredients more evenly. […] It’s a good idea to use a thick, heavy-bottomed piece of equipment when cooking or heating any items that can burn or break easily. – LA Times

 


-♥-
Katy

 

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